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Metro Youth Football League

Safety

All MYFL member organizations are required to participate in the USA Football program including Heads Up Tackling & Blocking. 
Organizations are also required to nominate a Player Safety Coach (PSC).  The PSC will monitor the organizations coaches / parents / players to ensure the correct implementation of USA Football guidelines and recommendations. 

Please visit USAFootball for more information. 



Player Safety
Player safety is the primary concern of both parents and coaches. We all want our players to be safe at all times and to have fun. An important precaution at the youth level is the proper fitting of equipment. We ensure all players have high quality helmets, padding, and other protective gear when on the playing field, which greatly minimizes the risk of injury.  It takes more than just great equipment to keep players safe.  It also takes proper coaching, player preparation, safe field conditions, and regular practice learning how to properly use the equipment. 

 

From a competition standpoint, age range and player weights play important roles in keeping players safe. Players are grouped according to their ages and weights, in order to avoid mismatches, and to offer maximum opportunity for safe participation.

CDC Heads Up Concussion Awareness and Certification 


Helmet Fitting and Care

  • Only the player and his organization can ensure the player is wearing his helmet and chin strap properly. Without this support, you are fighting a losing battle.
  • Check and maintain all snaps and buckles. Snaps and buckles tend to fatigue throughout the year and should be switched out on a regular basis.
  • Ensure the player is wearing the proper size helmet. Players tend to favor bigger helmets in order to gain more comfort.
  • Make sure the Jaw (S, Z or Face Frame Pads) are secure against the face and mandible. Pads should feel snug but not tight.
  • Make sure that the chin strap is centered under the player's chin and the straps are taut and even on both sides.
  • Don't over-inflate the helmets. Over inflation leads to more rotation, which can cause the helmet to roll and slide off the player's head.
  • Check and maintain face masks on a regular basis. After a few games face masks can loosen slightly, and can change the helmet's fit.


Concussion Awareness

Sports-related concussion in high school and youth sports can be serious or even life-threatening situations if not managed correctly. In order to help educate coaches, officials, parents and students on the importance of proper concussion recognition and management in high school sports, we have provided some free courses and links to concussion awareness. This information will help you understand the impact sports-related concussion can have on young players, how to recognize a suspected concussion, the proper protocols to manage a suspected concussion, and steps to help your player return to play safely after experiencing a concussion. 

Concussion Awareness. It is Nebraska Law! - Nebraska Law LB260 - Concussion Awareness Act

The LB260 Concussion law went into effect July 1, 2012.  There are three basic components of this new law:
1. All sports organizations that charge a fee for participants 19 years and younger are required to provide information on concussions to the participants and their parents or guardians. This can be done by any means (e-mail, web link, in person, or with practice information).
2. It also requires that coaches have training made available. The law does not mandate you keep records of who completes the training- just that it is made available to the coaches so they can understand the impact and recognize a possible concussion.
3. If an athlete is suspected of having a head injury or concussion, he or she must be immediately removed from play. The athlete is not allowed to return to participation until they have been evaluated by a licensed health care professional and written & signed clearance forms are received from the parents AND the licensed health care professional.


Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack. It is the result of structural or electrical disorders in the heart that lead to a potentially lethal arrhythmia.  Often, the first sign of a potential cardiac arrest is collapse during exercise. By having a properly trained staff and an AED (defibrillator) onsite, school and league administrators can greatly reduce tragic outcomes when SCA occurs.  
For more information, view the USAFootball Information Sheet


Other Information and Forms

The following Free On-Line Concussion Training Courses have been approved by Nebraska’s Chief Medical Officer for the Coaches Training:
CDC – Centers for Disease Control: Heads Up Concussions in Youth Sports  (Coaches can take this 20 minute video class and print out a certification document)
NFHS—National Federation of High Schools: Concussion in Sports—What You Need to Know
Sports Safety International: ConcussionWise (Courses for Coaches, Athletes, Parents, Athletic Trainers, Physicians, and Nurses)
ACTive™Athletic Concussion Training for Coaches: http://activecoach.orcasinc.com


Heat Related Articles

Mayo Clinic Article on Dehydration and Young Athletes 
 

Mayo Clinic Report: Injuries in Youth Football Are Uncommon 

Mayo Clinic Study Summary

Heat Related Articles

Mayo Clinic Article on Dehydration and Young Athletes 
 

Mayo Clinic Report: Injuries in Youth Football Are Uncommon 

Mayo Clinic Study Summary

Heat Related Articles

Mayo Clinic Article on Dehydration and Young Athletes 
 

Mayo Clinic Report: Injuries in Youth Football Are Uncommon 

Mayo Clinic Study Summary